Award winning DJs

Award-winning Wedding DJs – what’s all the fuss about?

It saddens me to read some of the negative comments coming from so-called fellow professional DJs regarding the validity, purpose, sincerity and how gullible they believe Brides to be when it comes to The Wedding Industry Awards. [Other, similar competitions are available] For the record, I have no connection with this or any other award organisation.

Best Wedding DJ

Wedding Industry Award winner Best Wedding DJ

 

Paying to enter a competition

The biggest bone of contention appears to be concerned with the entry fee. I have seen comments relating this fee to “buying awards”, “Give me £50 and I’ll create an award for you” etc. This is a ridiculous assumption. The entry fee does not guarantee an award. The fee covers promotion of the business that generates the publicity and administrates the voting process. You can’t buy an award. The awards will be distributed based on a process of Brides’ testimonials and a panel of Judges which includes past winning DJs.

 

It’s just a marketing scam, a licence to make money!

Err no, it’s a commercial entity – a business. All businesses have to cover their costs and make a PROFIT. What’s wrong with that? It’s no different from handing over your money to an advertising agency and getting them to produce advertisements for you. At the end of the day there is no guarantee that the advertisement will generate business. It might, but it might not. Advertising is a gamble and so too is entering an awards competition.

 

Entering a competition is a marketing ploy.

Subjecting your business to scrutiny by third parties, inviting feedback from clients and then exposing yourself  to an assessment process by other industry professionals is not for the feint-hearted. Your business needs to be robust. Your practices need to transparent and reputable. Standards will need to be well above the industry average for your area if you are to succeed at regional level and go on to National recognition.

Lifetime achievement award

Lifetime achievement award

Reluctance to encourage feedback

I really don’t understand why any wedding DJ would be reluctant to ask for a referral or a testimonial. Not doing so goes against just about every piece of acumen required to run a business. Successful businesses rely on recommendation. Satisfied clients are the most likely people to want to help you find more clients and share what they experienced. When I saw yesterday a comment from a mobile DJ saying “once the event is over I want to forget about it and move on to the next one”, I despair, I really do.

 

Being short-listed is great public relations and perceived credibility.

Being able to use the award company’s logo and mention your participation in the competition puts you one step ahead of the crowd. Perception is reality.  To me, seeing such a logo would encourage me to think this company is proactive and striving to be different or recognised for what they do and how they do it.

 

Nay-saying DJs provoke me to think that they are jealous and know deep down that they are unable to take part because their business would not stand-up to scrutiny and they would fail in the assessment process. Their clients would not deliver the quality of testimonials required. “Better to stand back and criticise than to admit some competitors actually do have higher standards valued by clients”

 

Taking part is great marketing. Winning is the bonus.

So by now you will be getting my message. Taking part and putting your business through the voting process will at least be therapeutic and insightful. At best the results will be a wake-up call and will focus your activity to improve how you are perceived by clients and how you measure up to their expectations.

 

Winning a regional or national award will generate interest in your business. How you handle that interest and convert it into new business is another challenge. Winning can also bring traps and potential downfalls because potential clients now have greater expectations. So winning can be a burden if you do not live up to your new-found status. The challenge just became a lot more difficult. It’s not easy making your way up the ladder to the top in any walk of life. Staying at the top is infinitely harder, not least because the pack is clawing at your heals wanting to pull you back down.

 

Please, give credit to Brides, they are not gullible.

I see so many DJs putting words, or rather thoughts, into Brides’ mouths. The general public are far more savvy than the DJs are trying to make out. They are well aware of what is going on here. They have a choice and will without doubt question the validity of awards and the accreditation process. The fact that other DJs may be sceptical is understandable. Brides will be sceptical too but that will not deter them from making an informed judgement after due diligence. Not all wedding DJ awards are the same. Buyer beware etc, etc. It is what it is. Overall Awards are good for the industry.

 

Well done, I say, to all DJ companies who enter award competitions. Good luck. Thank you for helping to raise the profile of our profession. May you businesses live long and prosper. May your clients enjoy service and satisfaction that far exceeds the average in your market? Above all, congratulations for having the guts, business acumen and foresight to grasp a marketing opportunity and to expose your business to the real world. To the organisers of such award competitions I also offer thanks. Thanks for offering a platform that will spotlight our DJ industry along-side the photographers, florists and venue dressers. Thanks for investing in websites and social media and reaching out to our potential clients [Brides] in places often not available to humble DJs. Thanks for your knowledge of the marketplace, advertising and award ceremony organisation.